The Only Investment Guide You’ll Ever Need By Andrew Tobias

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This looks like a good one, with some real world advice. If it has some humorous stories included, all the better. It’s hard to find that in an investing book. The Only Investment Guide You’ll Ever Need is not the only good book on investing.

  • I would recommend the book for those new to investing and personal finance, and as a quick read for those who may already have some experience.
  • “The Only Investment Guide You’ll Ever Need .
  • Seems pretty simple, and is similar to advice given by other authors such as Suzie Orman and David Bach.
  • This completely updated edition will show you how to use your money to your best advantage in today’s financial marketplace, no matter what your means.
  • Is it the only investment guide you’ll ever need?
  • Maybe for some, but certainly not for those who want to invest seriously.

In order to read or download the only investment guide youll ever need andrew tobias ebook, you need to create a FREE account. For nearly forty years, The Only Investment Guide You’ll forex analytics Ever Need has been a favorite finance guide, earning the allegiance of more than a million readers across America. The string of useless personal finance books continues.

Only Investment Guide

First published in 1934, Security Analysis is one of the most influential financial books ever written. Selling more than one million copies through five editions, it has provided generations of investors with the timeless value investing philosophy and techniques of Benjamin Graham and David L. Dodd. Peter Lynch, one of the most successful investors of all time, shows you how to use what you already know to make money in the market. Lynch is the former manager of the $9 billion Fidelity Magellan Fund, where he earned investors a $190,000 return on a $10,000 investment. One should omit complex, laborious, expensive, unreliable tactics that are alleged by some to enable one to achieve higher returns than the stock market average. (The book discusses an assortment of them and explains why one should not devote much time, effort, or expenditure of money to them.) One should merely periodically commit a fixed sum to index funds.

So if you’re already “converted” stick with Bogleheads’ Guide, but if you want a fun read, give the Only Investment Guide a chance. The How to Use the Price Rate of Change Indicator first few chapters discuss budgeting and general personal finance issues like paying off credit card debt and living within your means.

The Only Investment Guide You’ll Ever Need Review

I often recommend this as a “first” book for readers as an introduction to personal finance topics. This book is funny, sensible, and easy to read. Probably not as practical as the Bogleheads’ Guide, but a very easy read. The book covers a lot of topics like margin, options, short selling, penny stocks, https://forexarena.net/ mainly to make the point to avoid them, where the Bogleheads’ Guide instead goes into more depth on practical topics. The Only Investment Guide in my opinion, spends a LOT of energy discussing what NOT do to, where the Bogleheads’ Guide takes passive investing almost as a given, and takes it from there.

“The Only Investment Guide You’ll Ever Need . This completely updated edition will show you how to use your money to your best advantage in today’s financial marketplace, no matter what your means. Using concise, witty, and truly understandable tips and explanations, Andrew Tobias delivers sensible advice and useful information on savings, investments, preparing for retirement, and much more.

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I practiced what Tobias recommended and did really well with it. So, the funny thing about this book is that, despite the title, it exists in at least four or five editions, the first of which was written in 1978, and of which I own a copy.

The Only Investment Guide You’ll Ever Need Review

Seems pretty simple, and is similar to advice given by other authors such as Suzie Orman and David Bach. I would recommend the book for those new to investing and personal finance, and as a quick read for those who may already have some experience. Is it the only investment guide you’ll ever need? Maybe for some, but certainly not for those who want to invest seriously.

Those looking for a book with stock/mutual fund investing howtos should keep looking however. This is a broad brush stroke at handling one’s money. If you are going to read this book, be sure to read My Vast Fortune as well. The two tell quite a story and show that Mr Tobias is not just blowing air between his gums. This book is eminently readable and there is just not much wrong with it. This book helped me understand a lot and gave me the confidence I needed to deal with a chunk of severance money from a former employer. In that situation, obviously you need access to the cash if necessary, but maybe you also want to score some interest.

It’s actually decent in that it covers the necessity of frugality, budgeting, long-term planning, and investing. If you follow his strategies and advice, you will be wealthy when you’re ready to retire. If you are a beginning investor or are just starting out on your financial journey than this book might be for you. Andrew breaks down investing into really easy steps that anyone can accomplish. He discusses saving, doing taxes, stock markets, simple tax strategies and makes the entire process digestible. This is the common sense investment book that explains complex things very simply and in a funny way. I have found the advice in this book to be invaluable.

I read this book when it was first published in 1978! Awhile later, the value of precious metals began to climb and I bought into gold and silver, per Tobias’ advice. After holding it for around a year, I sold out, doubling and tripling my initial investment. As it turns out, that spike in 1980 was historic. I bought into the stock market throughout my life after Tobias first turned me on to the notion, and pretty much retired at the age of 52 with plenty of assets.

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It’s not even the only investment book you’ll need, if you have any special financial situations where expert advice is needed . But it covers just about everything you need to know, plus a bunch of stuff that’s merely fun to know. Many thanks, Taylor, for spotlighting my favorite book on personal finance. It is a fun read and chock-full of sound advice on most financial matters of concern to most people.

The Only Investment Guide You’ll Ever Need Review

Before reading this, I was confused about several instruments with about the same level of risk (CDs, money market funds, money market accounts, I-bonds, TIPs, and Treasury bills). Tobias laid it all out very clearly–and humorously–and helped me to evaluate the options intelligently. There’s also a great chapter on everyday savings you can make. It’s sort of like David Bach’s Latte Factor, but Tobias’s take is a lot smarter in its outlook and scope. This author started early as a whiz kid and is very accomplished, but he’s self-effacing and honest about his own mistakes–so you really do trust him to be straight with advice. Most people will definitely get something out of this book. I’ve been thinking about checking out some additional investment / financial advice books.

Audiobook Details

I have a copy of the 1978 edition, the first I believe. It was one of the first books about personal finance that I ever read. It contains good solid advice and is easy to read.

The Only Investment Guide You’ll Ever Need Review

Chapter 5 covers Bills, Bonds and Preferred Stock. Chapter 6 gives an overview of educational plans, 401 and IRAs, annuities, gifting of stock to charity. Chapter 7 and 8 covers stocks, bull and bear markets, diversification, managed vs. passive funds, costs. Chapter 9 covers specialized topics like DRIPS, short selling, IPOs, margin and leverage, options etc. Chapter 10 discusses how you might invest a windfall, and goes into some detail about open- and closed-end funds and ETFs. He spins his unsuccessful experiences into memorable and hilarious ‘How-Not-to-Invest’ stories throughout the book.

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I remember reading it in the mid-80s, and thought it was great. The personal finance ideas that I was able to take away from it worked well – I think he was the first person who ever mentioned no-load mutual funds in anything I was reading. Of course, I could never find a financial planner that would sell me any, they always wanted to earn their commissions selling me front loaded, poorly performing funds. It’s an ok book, it has the basic about money.